Anaheim Ducks: 4 Benefits of Adopting a Team Dog

NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 06: "Radar" from the Guide Dog Foundation watches warm-ups prior to the game between the New York Islanders and the Nashville Predators at the Barclays Center on October 06, 2018 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 06: "Radar" from the Guide Dog Foundation watches warm-ups prior to the game between the New York Islanders and the Nashville Predators at the Barclays Center on October 06, 2018 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images) /
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Anaheim Ducks
WINNIPEG, MB – DECEMBER 13: Winnipeg Jets security dog Grace stays alert as she patrols the arena prior to NHL action between the Jets and Edmonton Oilers at the Bell MTS Place on December 13, 2018, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Photo by Darcy Finley/NHLI via Getty Images) /

Team Unity and a Sense of Responsibility

Last season, the Anaheim Ducks had a huge issue getting on the same page. Most of the players had adopted a losing attitude. However, there were a select few who still wanted to win, but their desire to win was overshadowed by the complete lack of accountability and team unity.

Bringing in a team dog would give them all a common goal to work towards. Training a service dog is a hard job, and the Anaheim Ducks wouldn’t necessarily be responsible for all of it, but they would have a big hand in making sure the dog is socialized and learning how to do their job properly.

However, if the team can learn to work towards a common goal off the ice, imagine how that can help them when they’re playing the game. Not only would it promote team unity and give the entire team a sense of responsibility, but it could improve communication and help them understand one another better. A puppy is a lot like a child, and if the Anaheim Ducks learn to work together as equal partners in this exercise, they can implement those same practices on the ice as well.

It could also go a long way in helping specific players on the team. Nick Ritchie could benefit from having the added responsibility. It could aid him in learning how to control his temper. Plus, as mentioned previously, dogs promote the release of endorphins, which could help him become a much more focused and positive person on the ice.

As players like Troy Terry, Brendan Guhle, and Sam Steel take on more responsibility this season as well, having a team dog could help them become better acquainted with their teammates. They got to know them last season, but with a new coach and new ideas, it will help the veterans and the rookies make a smoother transition together.